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Notebook: Screen Print

One Hundred Years of Solitude

Subjective Memory


Symbol of Hair in an Image of Jesus

Cut or characteristic of a head of hair may reveal individuality or conformity, freedom or inhibition, even religion, proffesion, political persuation and the idols or trendsetters with whom person identifies.


Hair in images of gods and Bible:

Buddha - quiet curls suggest enlightened tranquility;
Apollo - classically ordered sunlike locks of gold;
Dionysus - dark, chaotic, tangled;
Harry Potter - black, unnily hair symbolise unconvencional ideas, magical powers;


The Egyptians let the hair of their head and beard grow only when they were in mourning, shaving it off at other times. The women of Egypt wore their hair long and plaited. Wigs were worn by priests and laymen to cover the shaven skull, and false beards were common. The great masses of hair seen in the portraits and statues of kings and priests are thus altogether artificial.
Among the Greeks the custom in this respect varied at different times, as it did also among the Romans. In the time of the apostle, among the Greeks the men wore short hair, while that of the women was long.
Among the Hebrews the natural distinction between the sexes was preserved by the women wearing long hair, while the men preserved theirs as a rule at a moderate length by frequent clipping. Baldness disqualified any one for the priest's office. Elijah is called a "hairy man" from his flowing locks, or more probably from the shaggy cloak of hair which he wore. His raiment was of camel's hair. Long hair is especially noticed in the description of Absalom's person; but the wearing of long hair was unusual, and was only practised as an act of religious observance by Nazarites and others in token of special mercies. In times of affliction the hair was cut off. Tearing the hair and letting it go dishevelled were also tokens of grief. "Cutting off the hair" is a figure of the entire destruction of a people. The Hebrews anointed the hair profusely with fragrant ointments, especially in seasons of rejoicing.
Easton's Bible Dictionary


Hair in Idol Worship

It is well known that among the surrounding heathen nations the hair of childhood or youth was often shaved and consecrated at idolatrous shrines. Frequently this custom marked an initiatory rite into the service of a divinity. It was therefore an abomination of the Gentiles in the eyes of the Jew, which is referred to in Leviticus 19:27 Jeremiah 9:26; Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32. The Syriac version of the latter passage renders, "Ye shall not let your hair grow long" (i.e. in order to cut it as a religious rite in honor of an idol). It is, however, probable that among the Jews, as now among many classes of Mohammedans, the periodical cropping of the hair, when it had become too cumbersome, was connected with some small festivity, when the weight of the hair was ascertained, and its weight in silver was given in charity to the poor.


Women's Hair

If Hebrew men paid much attention to their hair, it was even more so among Hebrew women. Long black tresses were the pride of the Jewish maiden and matron, but many of the expressions used in connection with the "coiffures" of women do not convey to us more than a vague idea. In New Testament times Christian women are warned against following the fashionable world in elaborate hairdressing.


Symbolical Use of Hair in Bible

Gray hairs and the hoary white of old age were highly honored by the Jews. Besides expressing old age, they stand for wisdom (The Wisdom of Solomon). Sometimes white hair is the emblem of a glorious, if not Divine, presence. Calamity befalling the gray-headed was doubly terrible (Genesis 42:38; Genesis 44:29). The "hair of the flesh" is said to "stand up" when sudden terror or fear takes hold of a person. The symbolical language of Isaiah 7:20 uses the "hair of the feet" and "the beard" as synonymous with "the humble" and the "mighty of the people."


References
Artists - Libraries
Books

1. Christopher Hitchens ('God is not Great' 2007, 'Mortality' 2012)
2. 'Faithfull' by Marianne Faithfull, David Dalton, 1995
3. Richard Dawkins 'The God Delusion' 2006
4. Emmanuel Carrère 'The Kingdom'
5. Ludwik Stomma 'Or maybe it was different? Anthropology of the History'
6. 'The Book Of Symbols: Reflections On Archetypal Images' Tachen 2010


Articles
1. Big Think 'A growing number of scholars are questioning the existence of Jesus'
2. "Interview with Virginie Despentes, French writer"
3. "Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hair"
4. "Hair - Symbol"
5. "5 Billion More: Population Growth During Laurie Anderson’s Lifetime"
Sound & Video

1. Grimes "Oblivion", live performances
2. PJ Harvey "Is This Desire?", album 1998 | "Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea", album 2000
3. Noir Désir - Le Vent Nous Portera
4. Brian Jonestown Massacre "Detka", song
5. Marillion "Misplaced Childhood", album


Movies

1. "National Geographic Witchcraft Myths and Legends"
2. "Secret Files of the Inquisition"


Screen Print

Etching

Gallery

Hair Gallery - Research & Inspirations


Buddha, Apollo, Dionysus, Harry Potter

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Mummies and mummy hair from ancient Egypt

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Hair Styles - Ancient Egypt, Greece & Israelites

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How a real Jesus looked like?

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Visions of Jesus

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Visions of Jesus
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Screen Print

Applications
"Screen printing is arguably the most versatile of all printing processes. It can be used to print on a wide variety of substrates, including paper, paperboard, plastics, glass, metals, fabrics, and many other materials. including paper, plastics, glass, metals, nylon and cotton. Some common products from the screen printing industry include posters, labels, decals, signage, and all types of textiles and electronic circuit boards. The advantage of screenprinting over other print processes is that the press can print on substrates of any shape, thickness and size.
A significant characteristic of screen printing is that a greater thickness of the ink can be applied to the substrate than is possible with other printing techniques. This allows for some very interesting effects that are not possible using other printing methods. Because of the simplicity of the application process, a wider range of inks and dyes are available for use in screen printing than for use in any other printing process. Screen Print Process Overview
Screen printing consists of three elements: the screen which is the image carrier; the squeegee; and ink. The screen printing process uses a porous mesh stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential to accurate color registration. The mesh is made of porous fabric or stainless steel mesh. A stencil is produced on the screen either manually or photochemically. The stencil defines the image to be printed in other printing technologies this would be referred to as the image plate.
Screen printing ink is applied to the substrate by placing the screen over the material. Ink with a paint-like consistency is placed onto the top of the screen. Ink is then forced through the fine mesh openings using a squeegee that is drawn across the scree, applying pressure thereby forcing the ink through the open areas of the screen. Ink will pass through only in areas where no stencil is applied, thus forming an image on the printing substrate. The diameter of the threads and the thread count of the mesh will determine how much ink is deposited onto the substrates.
Many factors such as composition, size and form, angle, pressure, and speed of the blade (squeegee) determine the quality of the impression made by the squeegee. At one time most blades were made from rubber which, however, is prone to wear and edge nicks and has a tendency to warp and distort. While blades continue to be made from rubbers such as neoprene, most are now made from polyurethane which can produce as many as 25,000 impressions without significant degradation of the image.
If the item was printed on a manual or automatic screen press the printed product will be placed on a conveyor belt which carries the item into the drying oven or through the UV curing system. Rotary screen presses feed the material through the drying or curing system automatically. Air drying of certain inks, though rare in the industry, is still sometimes utilized.
The rate of screen printing production was once dictated by the drying rate of the screen print inks. Do to improvements and innovations the production rate has greatly increased. Some specific innovations which affected the production rate and has also increased screen press popularity include: 1. Development of automatic presses versus hand operated presses which have comparatively slow production times. 2. Improved drying systems which significantly improves production rate. 3. Development and improvement of U.V. curable ink technologies 4. Development of the rotary screen press which allows continuous operation of the press. This is one of the more recent technology developments."
www.pneac.org/printprocesses/screen/


Funcadelic "Maggot Brain"